Ascetic practices, concentration and bodily postures described in the Vedas may have been precursors to yoga.[59][60] According to Geoffrey Samuel, "Our best evidence to date suggests that [yogic] practices developed in the same ascetic circles as the early sramana movements (Buddhists, Jainas and Ajivikas), probably in around the sixth and fifth centuries BCE."[9]
The environment is often cited as an important factor influencing the health status of individuals. This includes characteristics of the natural environment, the built environment and the social environment. Factors such as clean water and air, adequate housing, and safe communities and roads all have been found to contribute to good health, especially to the health of infants and children.[18][29] Some studies have shown that a lack of neighborhood recreational spaces including natural environment leads to lower levels of personal satisfaction and higher levels of obesity, linked to lower overall health and well being.[30] This suggests that the positive health benefits of natural space in urban neighborhoods should be taken into account in public policy and land use.
If the meaning of yoga is understood as the practice of nirodha (mental control), then its goal is "the unqualified state of niruddha (the perfection of that process)",[147] according to Baba Hari Dass. In that context, "yoga (union) implies duality (as in joining of two things or principles); the result of yoga is the nondual state", and "as the union of the lower self and higher Self. The nondual state is characterized by the absence of individuality; it can be described as eternal peace, pure love, Self-realization, or liberation."[148]
The Yoga Yajnavalkya is a classical treatise on yoga attributed to the Vedic sage Yajnavalkya. It takes the form of a dialogue between Yajnavalkya and Gargi, a renowned philosopher.[162] The text contains 12 chapters and its origin has been traced to the period between the second century BCE and fourth century CE.[163] Many yoga texts like the Hatha Yoga Pradipika, the Yoga Kundalini and the Yoga Tattva Upanishads have borrowed verses from or make frequent references to the Yoga Yajnavalkya.[164] The Yoga Yajnavalkya discusses eight yoga Asanas – Swastika, Gomukha, Padma, Vira, Simha, Bhadra, Mukta and Mayura,[165] numerous breathing exercises for body cleansing,[166] and meditation.[167]

*Pay initiation fee plus first and last months’ dues. Initiation fee ranges between $29.99-$49.99, and monthly dues range between $29.99-$99.99 per month, depending on club location and type. Pay $49.99 Annual Fee once during fourth month of enrollment and annually thereafter. Offer available online or in club. Offer applies to select One-Club Commitment memberships at Sport and Active clubs only. Offer not available at Super-Sport or Ultra-Sport clubs. Excludes All-Club, Basic, Add-On and Limited Term Prepaid memberships. One year commitment required for Commitment memberships. Selected club of enrollment must be within 50 miles of purchaser’s residence. One-Club access is for club of enrollment only. Taxes may apply. Not valid for current members. Dues must be paid by pre-authorized payment (eft). Must be at least 18 years old or 12 with parent. No other discounts with this offer. Incentives may be offered for other memberships. Facilities and amenities vary per location. Kids’ Club, Personal/Group Training, specialty classes and class reservations are available for an additional fee. Not all clubs open 24 hours every day. See club for details. Excludes select Hawaii, San Francisco Bay Area and Monterey Bay Area clubs. Valid through 11:59 (PT) on 6/9/2019. © 2019 24 Hour Fitness USA, Inc. Texas Health Studio #080501. Florida Registration Numbers HS4505, HS4504, HS7025, HS7004, HS7479, HS7621, HS7436, HS7746, HS7663, HS7776, HS7805, HS12038, HS11951, HS12546, HS12661, HS12874.
"...[T]here is the cultivation of meditative and contemplative techniques aimed at producing what might, for the lack of a suitable technical term in English, be referred to as 'altered states of consciousness'. In the technical vocabulary of Indian religious texts such states come to be termed 'meditations' ([Skt.:] dhyāna / [Pali:] jhāna) or 'concentrations' (samādhi); the attainment of such states of consciousness was generally regarded as bringing the practitioner to deeper knowledge and experience of the nature of the world." (Gethin, 1998, p. 10.)
A yoga system that predated the Buddhist school is Jain yoga. But since Jain sources postdate Buddhist ones, it is difficult to distinguish between the nature of the early Jain school and elements derived from other schools.[89] Most of the other contemporary yoga systems alluded in the Upanishads and some Buddhist texts are lost to time.[90][91][note 12] https://buzzingoffer.tumblr.com/
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